Ask Me Anything: Dave Ulrich

In a Facebook Live exclusive Professor Dave Ulrich discusses HR in the global economy, United Airlines’ tough year, and a pant-splitting presentation in Singapore.

This interview was conducted live via Facebook from HRM Asia’s Smart Workforce Summit, at 12:40pm on Thursday, September 21.

The questions were sent in by readers via HRM Asia.com and our Facebook page beforehand, mixed in with talking points from HRM Magazine’s editorial team.

The Questions:

(00:31 From Jerome T) What is the history of the moniker “Father of HR”? How do you feel about that title?

(01:25 From Mel Buenviage) Compared to the rest of the world, how fast is Singapore’s HR profession progressing? Are there any other countries in Asia-Pacific standing out?

(03:01) In the research you presented yesterday, you noted that the best outcomes come from an 80% focus on organisation and only 20% on individuals. That seems a big reversal on some traditional thinking – where do you think that leaves HR?

(04:28 From Jed Bandiola) Do you recall any famous examples where HR and culture have added real value to an organisation – or where bad HR has cost them?

(06:15) What are your thoughts on that United Airlines incident from this year?

(09:00 From RH Hidalgo) What’s the most memorable presentation you’ve made here in Singapore?

(10:10 From the Career Advice column in HRM Magazine) I am set to become redundant in the New Year as my company moves to outsource its HR services. I am being positive and see it as an opportunity to find work that is more strategic than my current transactional role. Do you have any advice for taking best advantage of this situation?

(12:25) What’s the one thing HR professionals need to know and understand to stay relevant as the world changes around us?

(13:14 From RH Hidalgo) What leadership style is most effective in this day and age?

(13:40) Do you get any time off during the year? What do you do for fun?

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